Blog Archives - Page 2 of 3 - AZ Clinical Trials

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Since the beginning of the COVID-19 vaccine distribution, 43.7% of Americans are now fully vaccinated. Most states have fully opened, and most have fully lifted mask mandates. Daily new cases and deaths are at a fraction of where they were previously. Nevertheless, they are still occurring. Is this the end of quarantine? Not yet.

Group of people unmasking, COVID-19

Quarantine Guidelines from the CDC

Just because many people are vaccinated doesn’t mean those exposed to COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms no longer have to quarantine. The vaccinations have changed things a little but are mainly divided into directives for fully, partially, and unvaccinated individuals. Here is what the CDC says:

  • Unvaccinated must quarantine:
    • 10 days since symptoms first appeared and
    • 24 hours with no fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and
    • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving.
  • Partially vaccinated means:
    • You have either not received your 2nd dose, or:
  • It has not been 2 weeks since your second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.
  • It has not been 2 weeks since your single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen.
  • Partially vaccinated individuals experiencing symptoms or exposed to the virus would need to follow the standard quarantine guidelines as an unvaccinated person does.
  • Fully vaccinated exposure to virus:
    • You do not need to stay away from others or go through testing unless you have symptoms. Symptomatic fully vaccinated individuals will then follow the standard quarantine guidelines listed under unvaccinated individuals.

Herd Immunity and Continuing the Fight

Herd immunity became a buzzword when cases skyrocketed last year. It means the number of people in a population who can get the disease drops to such a low level that any new cases cannot spread. The problem is that accomplishing herd immunity means isolating people with symptoms and isolation from any new factors altering what we know about the disease. Neither of which is present in COVID-19. Variations in the virus and vaccine hesitancy further challenge the reality of reaching herd immunity.

The reduction in cases and deaths is directly related to vaccine distribution and emerging treatments. The data gathered so far has shown vaccines are effective at preventing the virus, while treatments are helping more people to recover once they get it.

COVID-19 is not over

Is this the end of the need for quarantine? No. If the virus has taught us anything, it’s to be respectful of each other’s health. It’s also evident that when a community unites against a public health threat, nothing’s impossible. Get involved in COVID-19 studies currently enrolling here at Arizona Liver Health. Healthy individuals, those experiencing symptoms, or have tested positive for COVID-19 are needed. Call us at (480) 360-4000 or visit our website to learn more!

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/end-home-isolation.html

https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2021/05/Herd-immunity-illusive-vaccination-best-to-stave-off-COVID-19.html


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When it comes to detecting and identifying the severity of liver disease, the gold standard is typically a liver biopsy. Newer technological advances have paved the way for other non-invasive options such as the fibroscan. It comes without any risks. It’s also cheaper, quicker, and more accurate. If you are at risk for or already have liver disease, your overall health depends on early detection and regular monitoring. Both are just some of the reasons your liver can benefit from fibroscan technology.

Time-Tested, Trusted Technology.

For decades, ultrasound technology has enabled us to see a growing baby in the womb and many other medical uses. Fibroscan technology harnesses this technology to measure the stiffness of the liver. As the sound waves pass through the liver, the device measures how fast they go. The faster they move, through it, the greater the degree of fibrosis or stiffness. There are over 100 types of liver disease. However, most will follow the same path of progressive damage.

Don't treat your liver like chopped liver

Chronic inflammation as the body repeatedly attempts to heal the liver ironically ends up doing the exact opposite. In a healthy liver, the body produces and transports collagen to repair the damage. It does this by surrounding healthy tissue and strengthening it. With liver disease, more collagen is sent than needed. It builds up between liver cells, binding with other proteins forming scar tissue or fibrosis. The scarring can reduce or stop blood flow, starving and killing healthy cells. More scarring occurs, eventually replacing more and more healthy cells with non-function performing scar tissue.

Early Detection, Progression Monitoring, Lifesaving. 

The liver is a regenerative organ and can heal itself even well into the later stages of liver disease. Ideally, those at risk of developing liver disease would work with their doctor to proactively monitor their liver health. By measuring the degree of stiffness, fibroscan technology can detect the presence of liver issues. Similarly, it is an essential monitoring tool for managing disease progression, stagnation, and regression.

There isn’t a limit to the number of times your provider can perform a fibroscan. In turn, this allows for real-time results measuring how well lifestyle modifications and other therapies are working. The best part is that along with typical lab tests, fibroscan technology continues reducing the need for liver biopsies. Ultimately, it is improving, prolonging, and easing the management of the lives of liver disease patients. Your liver really can benefit from a fibroscan!

Free fibroscan for adults at risk

Arizona Liver Health offers FREE fibroscans for adults at risk of developing liver disease. Based on the exam results, you may be eligible to participate in currently enrolling research studies evaluating potential new options for liver diseases like NASH. Take control of your liver health today! Schedule your free screen by calling (480) 470-4000 or requesting an appointment online.

Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3594956/

https://hemaware.org/bleeding-disorders-z/do-wave

https://www.hje.org.uk/benefits-fibroscan-liver-health/


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Regular physical activity is the cornerstone of a healthier body and quality of life. It also has been proven to reduce your risk of chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Physical activity and liver disease go hand in hand. It could even save your life.

Exercise and the Effect on the Liver

Exercises focusing on your cardiovascular system have a positive influence on blood oxygenation. These activities increase your heart rate and change your breathing pattern. In turn, this increases the amount of oxygen you take in and quickly delivers oxygen to your vital body organs, such as your liver. Exercise also reduces stress on the liver, raises energy levels, and helps prevent obesity, a risk factor for liver disease. Other benefits include:

  • Maintaining a healthy weight helps prevent developing conditions that can lead to liver damage. Examples are fatty liver, elevated blood glucose, diabetes, and elevated blood insulin.
  • Regular exercise helps ease the depressive effects by triggering the release of endorphins. Exercise also helps balance out neurotransmitter levels. Together, these promote a sense of well-being and strength.
  • In addition to improving the delivery of oxygen to vital organs, regular exercise improves the efficiency of the cardiovascular system. The outcome helps greatly improve energy levels.

Scar tissues form in the liver because of the progressive damage. Ultimately, fibrous scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue leading to chronic damage (cirrhosis). Cirrhosis is often accompanied by loss of muscle mass and strength. Therefore, for those already with liver disease, physical activity may not only be beneficial but interventional too.

Life-Saving Benefits Discovered Thanks to Research Studies

The fact that exercising comes with many benefits is not some new revolutionary concept. Most of us know it’s good for you and maintaining a healthier lifestyle. A recent clinical research study proved a ground-breaking theory in the correlation of physical activity and cirrhosis-related deaths. It showed a 73% reduction in mortality risk when patients regularly walked during the week. When strength training was combined with walking, the risk was even less.

Liver disease research

As we continue learning more about liver disease and what causes it to develop, we increase community awareness and improve the lives of those living with this condition. A greater understanding of the disease also equips scientists and researchers with the tools necessary to improve management options. Arizona Liver Health is seeking participants to join enrolling studies for individuals diagnosed with NASH. NASH is a more severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and a growing epidemic in America. Learn more about how you can get involved by calling us at (480) 470-4000 or stopping by our website.

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/physical-activity.htm#:~:text=Regular%20physical%20activity%20helps%20improve,depression%20and%20anxiety%2C%20and%20dementia.

https://www.liversupport.com/exercise-for-chronic-liver-disease/

https://www.livestrong.com/article/287774-the-effect-of-exercise-on-liver-function/


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As vaccine doses increase and mask mandates lift, it’s hard to imagine how much work is left to do in ending the COVID-19 pandemic. Numbers are trending down, and while that’s great news, scientists, researchers, and health officials work diligently to increase our knowledge of the virus and expand how we detect, treat, and prevent it. The end may be closer than ever, but it’s not over. The fight to end COVID-19 pushes on and your help is needed more than ever.

 Research Studies are Vital to Ending COVID-19

The virus that causes COVID-19 isn’t new. However,  the symptoms it triggers categorizes it into a new type of coronavirus. This means we would need new ways to detect, manage, and prevent this specific strain. Clinical research studies help us learn more about the virus. The information we learn can re-purpose previously approved therapies and design potential new ones.

Research studies also play a vital role in evaluating how effective and safe potential new therapies are as they interact with the human body after lab evaluation. After completing all required phases of research, the FDA reviews the data and issues an approval or denial. Every FDA-approved therapy and device has gone through this process.

Diverse group of people, clinical research volunteers

Expanding Options and the Finish Line

During extreme emergencies such as public health crises, the FDA can issue Emergency Use Authorization to potential new therapies. An EUA permits the public distribution and the use of unapproved drugs. Or, unapproved uses of approved medicines under specific guidelines. For COVID-19, one treatment thus far has full FDA approval. Remdesivir was developed over a decade ago. It received approval last year in late October to treat adults and children sick enough to need hospitalization. All three vaccines in circulation are under emergency use, along with treatments including:

  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Antivirals
  • Immune modulators
  • Convalescent plasma

The progress thus far is without a doubt thanks to the continued efforts of clinical research studies and those individuals who participate in them. Work continues to expand options for covering variants of the virus, younger patients, disease stage, and symptom severities. Also, to gather the remaining data needed to move those options under emergency use to full FDA approval.

Are You Experiencing COVID-19 Symptoms?

Clinical research participants are the lifeblood of medical advances. Hundreds of thousands of individuals to date have joined in the unprecedented fight to end COVID-19. We will need many more before the end.

Schedule a free covid-19 test today

If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, Arizona Clinical Trials is offering FREE testing! Those with a positive result will be given the opportunity to see if they are eligible to participate in enrolling clinical trials. Get tested and get involved today! Call us at (480) 360-4000 or visit our website.

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/heres-exactly-where-were-at-with-vaccines-and-treatments-for-covid-19#Antivirals

https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/covid-19-vaccines#:~:text=The%20FDA%20has%20regulatory%20processes,include%20adolescents%2012%20through%2015.

https://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/view/end-of-the-covid-19-pandemic-so-close-and-yet-


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Accurate vaccine information is critical now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. Knowing which sources of information you can trust can be complex. You may have heard claims about the vaccines on social media or from family or friends. Or the rapid development and approval of these vaccines may have made you hesitant about their safety or effectiveness. The truth is, vaccines are the best chance we have of ending COVID-19. It’s time to set the record straight and get the facts behind 5 of the most common myths about COVID-19 vaccines.

Spread facts not fear. Explore COVID-19 research studies

Top 5 Myths Busted

Myth #1: The COVID-19 vaccine was rushed, so it can’t be safe.

Truth: The CDC said it best, “COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. COVID-19 vaccines were evaluated in tens of thousands of participants in clinical trials. The vaccines met FDA’s rigorous scientific standards for safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality needed to support emergency use authorization (EUA). “

Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines will undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to ensure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe.

Myth #2: It will alter your DNA.

Truth: Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to fight COVID-19. However, it never enters the nucleus of the cell, where we keep our DNA. The genetic material in the vaccines cannot affect or interact in any way with our DNA.

Myth #3: If you’ve already had COVID-19, you don’t need to get the vaccine.

Truth: There are severe health risks associated with COVID-19, and it is possible to get reinfected. Therefore, individuals may benefit from getting the vaccine.

Myth #4: The vaccine will deliver a microchip into your body.

Truth: This myth was started after a comment made by Bill Gates about vaccine registry and wasn’t even referring to a microchip. There is no vaccine microchip, and the vaccine will not gather any personal information or track people.

Myth #5: It affects fertility.

Truth: Currently, there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, and there is no evidence that fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

The Truth is Out There

Spread hope not covid

When researching the COVID-19 vaccines on the internet, check that the information comes from a credible source that is updated regularly. Millions of people have been affected by this virus, but together, we can help to end COVID-19. Arizona Clinical Trials offers FREE COVID-19 screenings and conducts research studies looking into potential new ways to treat and prevent it. To learn how you can get involved, call 480-360-4000, or visit our website.

References:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-19-vaccines-myth-versus-fact

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html

https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/featured-topic/covid-19-vaccine-myths-debunked


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Indeed, the liver is a resilient, amazing organ. However, it isn’t indestructible, and its health is vital to your body’s overall wellness. Anyone can develop liver disease, so Arizona Liver Health has 10 tips to keep your liver happy and healthy.

10 Tips for Overall Liver Health

Take good care of your liver and your liver will take good care of you

1. Maintain a healthy weight.

Even those somewhat overweight are in danger of having a fatty liver that can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Losing weight can play a vital role in helping to reduce liver fat.

2. Eat healthily.

Avoid foods high in calories, sugars, and saturated fats. A well-adjusted diet includes fresh fruits, vegetables, whole-grain breads, rice, and cereals. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are good fats. They are found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and fish are “good” fats. Hepatitis A is contracted from contaminated food and water. Avoid raw or contaminated seafood or shellfish to be safe.

3. Exercise regularly.

Exercising consistently (30 minutes per day, 5 days a week) helps burn triglycerides for fuel. It can also reduce liver fat.

4. Keep chronic conditions managed.

Conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol are major risk factors for fatty liver disease. Keeping them under reasonable control with diet can help limit and prevent liver damage.

5. Limit alcohol use.

Overindulging in alcohol can damage or destroy liver cells and scar your liver. Talk to your doctor about what the right amount of alcohol is for you.

6. Cut down smoking or stop smoking. 

Smoking has been linked to liver cancer and can also enhance the toxic effects that some medications have on the liver.

7. Practice safe sex.

Having unprotected sex or sex with multiple partners increases your risk of developing hepatitis B and hepatitis C.

8. Wash your hands.

Use soap and warm water immediately after using the bathroom or changing a diaper. Also before preparing or eating food.

9. Follow given directions on all medications.

You can harm your liver when you take medications incorrectly or by taking too much. Always let your doctor know about any over-the-counter medicines, supplements, and natural remedies that you use.

10. Get available hepatitis vaccinations.

Currently, there are vaccines for hepatitis A and hepatitis B. There is not a vaccine for hepatitis C.

Arizona Liver Health is committed to advancing options for liver disease patients through the research studies we conduct. Volunteers participating in clinical research make these advancements possible. When you have liver disease, and you join a study, you prioritize your health by learning more about your condition and potentially gaining access to new therapies not publicly available.

Don't leave your liver to fend for itself

To see how you can get involved in one of our enrolling liver studies, call (480) 470-4000, or visit our website.

References:

https://www.healthxchange.sg/digestive-system/liver/tips-healthy-liver

https://liverfoundation.org/13-ways-to-a-healthy-liver/

 


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thoughAfter a diagnosis of COVID-19, most patients with mild cases return home to quarantine and begin recovery. The thought may sound daunting, but don’t worry. With the proper precautions and knowing the warning signs, you do it. When treating mild cases of COVID-19, you are safer at home.

Caring for Yourself, Caring for Others

Whether you are caring for yourself or a loved one, there are a few things to keep in mind when recovering at home. Make sure to follow all safety protocols because the safety of the patient and caregiver is equally important.

Protecting others also means protecting yourself explore COVID-19 research studies today

  • Recovery Area
    • The patient should have a separate room with private bathroom access, if possible. If not, a sectioned area in a room will work. The bathroom would need to be sanitized after each use as well.
  • Protect Yourself and Others
    • A person must be isolated in quarantine for up to 10 days after the first symptoms began and 24 hours after being fever-free. Depending on the person recovering, the doctor may require a longer time.
    • Use a face mask
    • Wash your hands often
    • Cough into a tissue that you throw away immediately
    • Clean frequently touched surfaces often
    • Don’t share personal items, like dishes, towels, or bedding. Wash all items thoroughly.
  • Managing Symptoms
    • Take Tylenol to help reduce fevers
    • Stay hydrated by drinking water or juice
    • Resting will give your body the energy it needs to fight off the virus

Warning Signs

Call 911 immediately if you are having a hard time waking the patient up or they are showing any of the other warning signs:

  • Breathing trouble
  • Chest pain or pressure that is not alleviated
  • New confusion
  • Bluish color of lips or face
  • Inability to stay awake

COVID-19 Positive Adults Research

Clinical research studies help develop safe and effective ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent conditions like COVID-19. Research studies are why we have vaccines and other therapies available to help patients beat the virus. Without volunteers participating in research studies, these advancements wouldn’t be possible.

The lasting effects of COVID-19 are still unknown, COVID-19 research

Though we’ve come a long way, the battle is far from over. A diagnosis of COVID-19 can often come with an overwhelming sense of helplessness. But as research continues, everyone willing and able can help in the fight to end COVIID-19. If you have a positive diagnosis of COVID-19 within the last 96 hours, research studies here at Arizona Clinical Trials may be an option. Contact us at 480-360-4000 to learn more, or visit our website.

References:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/in-depth/treating-covid-19-at-home/art-20483273

https://www.umms.org/coronavirus/what-to-know/treat-covid-at-home

 


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We get it. Everyone is tired of COVID-19. After a year of restrictions and safety measures, the desire to see the end grows more each day. Pandemic fatigue is tightening its grip on the world as more and more people begin to break from the confines meant to protect them. What is it, you ask? Keep reading to find out and how you can manage it.

What is It?

When people are asked to make behavior changes over a long period, they can develop pandemic fatigue. The condition occurs because behavior changes are typically meant for the short term. When they extend longer, it becomes harder and harder to continue those changes. It is similar to starting a new diet or lifestyle change. These require daily efforts, and it isn’t easy to sustain after a while.

Older woman sitting with one hand on head and the other petting her dog

During COVID-19, pandemic fatigue is more concerning because people are venturing outside safety precautions as compliance steadily drops. The reasons behind why people develop it take away the motivation to keep a person’s eye on the prize. Causes may be political, social, or due to diminishing expert trust.

Ways to Manage It

Anxiety and depression often accompany pandemic fatigue. If your mental health concerns you, talk with your doctor immediately. Self-care is vital in managing pandemic fatigue. Here are a few ways you can help yourself at home:

  • Check-in with yourself and accept that fatigue, anxiety, and depression are understandable in these unprecedented times.
  • Stop “doom-scrolling” and limit screen time.
  • Manage stress by using breathing and meditation techniques.
  • Carve out time to restore and replenish energy. Take a walk, enjoy a bath or other activities that are deliberately calming.
  • Make movement a daily priority to stay active.

Research Volunteers Give Back and Get Back

Clinical research studies play a vital role in the advancement of medicine for conditions like COVID-19. They pave the way for improved treatment, detection, and prevention methods by evaluating the safety and effectiveness of new therapies. Research volunteers are the reason these advancements are possible. Giving back to others has been proven to restore confidence and combat depression and anxiety.

medical advancements aren't possible without our volunteers

To learn how you can get involved in enrolling studies here at Arizona Liver Health, call (480) 470-4000, or visit our website.

References:

https://www.uchealth.org/today/5-tips-for-handling-pandemic-fatigue/

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-we-can-deal-with-pandemic-fatigue/

https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/13/health/pandemic-fatigue-vaccine-wellness/index.html

 


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February 11, 2021 Clinical ResearchliverPCOS0

Approximately 1 in 10 women of childbearing age experiences Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). PCOS is the leading cause of infertility, among the many other symptoms this condition creates. A growing body of evidence shows PCOS is linked to other health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, mental illness, and others. In the last few years, fatty liver has also been listed in connection with PCOS. More than ever, those diagnosed need to be vigilant about self-care and overall wellbeing. By falling in love with your health now, you can head off medical issues later.

Why PCOS and Fatty Liver are Linked

PCOS is the acronym for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and is an imbalance of the reproductive hormones. Higher than normal male hormone (androgens) and insulin levels are the top factors in developing PCOS. The imbalance causes issues in the ovaries that affect how the eggs develop and when they are released. Infertility, ovarian cysts, excess hair, weight gain, and acne are common signs.

15-55% of women with PCOS experience liver disease, explore research studies today

When you look at the connection of PCOS to other health conditions like diabetes, fatty liver, and heart disease, the answer is in the risk factors. Fatty liver is highly prevalent in women with PCOS due to the following factors:

  • Being overweight
  • High triglycerides
  • Elevated LDL cholesterol level
  • Excessive consumption of fat, sugar, and refined foods
  • Lack of exercise

The factors listed above can cause the unhealthy accumulation of fat cells in the liver. Though a healthy liver will contain some fat, too much fat can lead to fatty liver disease. Lifestyle changes must occur along with early testing and intervention to prevent the progression of NAFLD, NASH, liver cirrhosis, and failure.

You ARE at Risk with PCOS

If you have PCOS, talk with your doctor about regular screenings to check your liver’s health. In most cases, liver disease can be prevented or even reversed if caught early enough with healthier living. You can love your health by starting the changes now. Some examples include:

  • Exercising at least 150 minutes a week at a moderate pace.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Avoiding excess consumption of foods that are processed, high in sugar, and high in unhealthy fats. Instead, go for more vegetables, lean meats, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids and are liver-friendly.
  • Avoid drinking excessive amounts of alcohol.
  • Keep chronic conditions managed.

Volunteers make clinical research sweet, two hands holding heart shaped lollipops, happy valentines day, PCOS and fatty liver

The connection between fatty liver and PCOS is still relatively new. Clinical research studies continue to help us learn more about the relationships between the two conditions. The knowledge we gain allows us to design better ways to detect, prevent, and treat PCOS and fatty liver. Arizona Liver Health is seeking participants to join studies looking into potential new options for women with PCOS and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). To learn more, call (480) 470-4000, or visit our website.

 

References:

https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/polycystic-ovary-syndrome

https://www.verywellhealth.com/pcos-preventing-fatty-liver-disease-2616334



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