Blog Archives - AZ Clinical Trials

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At their very root, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis are two medical conditions that affect the liver. However, this seemingly separate duo shares more in common than you may think. When NASH and cirrhosis get together, your liver is at the heart of their destruction. Knowing their similarities and how they differ is part of the ongoing education slowing a growing epidemic for our liver and overall health.

What is NASH?

NASH is the most severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is an umbrella term for various diseases that cause excess fat accumulation in the liver. Many individuals with NAFLD have a simple fatty liver without any complications. On the other hand, around 25% develop NASH. NASH is the chronic inflammation of the liver triggered by the immune system after enough fat accumulation.

Over time, chronic inflammation starts to damage and scar the liver, leading to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure.

Liver damage

What is Cirrhosis?

Cirrhosis is a chronic, long-term condition where scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue. Viruses like hepatitis, alcohol abuse and NAFLD like NASH are the most common causes of cirrhosis. In regards to NASH, the damage from chronic inflammation comes from the body’s healing response continuing when it’s meant to stop once repairs are complete. Instead of eliminating excess repair supplies like collagen, it continues depositing it. This results in fibrous scar tissue that spreads across and stiffens the liver.

Without treatment, cirrhosis can lead to loss of liver function and progress to liver cancer and liver failure.

7 signs of liver disease

A Growing Epidemic

NAFLD is the most common chronic liver condition in the U.S. At the current rate, health experts expect NASH prevalence to increase 63% by 2030. Because most people don’t know they have NASH, we can only estimate how many individuals have it. While even the estimations can be scary, it’s never too late to get your liver health back on track. Many factors fuel NASH. However, obesity, diabetes, and other conditions caused by unhealthy lifestyle choices are among the most common causes.

By knowing your risk for NASH, you and your provider can begin regularly monitoring your liver, and you can make healthier lifestyle changes. Together, these can significantly positively impact the progression and prevention of liver disease.

Prioritizing Your Liver Health May be Easier Thank You Think!

Prioritizing your liver health doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Arizona Liver Health has options to help you get started. Do you know you’re at risk for liver disease but haven’t gotten checked out? No problem! We offer a FREE fibroscan for adults at risk of liver disease that can quickly and painlessly determine your liver health. We also conduct clinical research studies to help expand care options for individuals living with liver disease.

Trying to take care of your liver, but don't know where to start?

So, if your fibroscan results indicate the presence of a liver condition, our team will talk with you about enrolling study options that may help!

Click on the links above to learn more, or call us today at (480) 470-4000.

Sources:

https://www.the-nash-education-program.com/what-is-nash/how-prevalent-is-nash/

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/liver-disease/nafld-nash/definition-facts

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/chronic-liver-disease-cirrhosis#:~:text=The%20most%20common%20causes%20of,triglycerides%2C%20and%20high%20blood%20pressure)

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/liver-disease/cirrhosis/symptoms-causes


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Evusheld is a long-acting investigational protective measure against COVID-19, featuring a combination of two monoclonal antibodies. The FDA recently gave its approval under an emergency use authorization (EUA). Evusheld is a game-changer for liver patients and other individuals with a compromised immune system.

What is Evusheld, and Who Can Use It?

Evusheld is a combination of two long-acting monoclonal antibodies:

  • Tixagevimab
  • Cilgavimab

Scientists create monoclonal antibodies in a laboratory to act as your own antibodies. Their purpose is to restore, modify, and enhance the body’s immune system’s attack on harmful cells or contagions like COVID-19.

Monoclonal antibodies

Evusheld has approval under an EUA for the pre-exposure prevention of COVID-19 in adults and pediatric individuals at a higher risk of an inadequate immune response. This population includes immunocompromised people, such as those with cancer or transplant patients or anyone taking medicines that suppress the immune system.

Eligibility Criteria:

Adults and pediatric individuals (12 years of age and older weighing at least 88 pounds 40 kg):

  • Who are not currently infected with SARS-CoV-2 and who have not had a known recent exposure to an individual infected with SARS-CoV-2, AND:
  • Who have moderate to severe immune compromise due to a medical condition or receipt of immunosuppressive medications or treatments and may not mount an adequate immune response to COVID-19 vaccination, OR
  • For whom vaccination with any available COVID-19 vaccine, according to the approved or authorized schedule, is not recommended due to a history of severe adverse reaction (e.g., severe allergic reaction) to a COVID-19 vaccine(s) and/or COVID-19 vaccine component(s).

COVID-19 Protection Vs. Traditional Vaccine Route

Though current COVID-19 vaccines are safe, well-tolerated, and effective, individuals with compromised immune systems face a different challenge. In some instances, some patients who are immunocompromised might not generate a robust enough immune response. As a result, they may remain susceptible to contracting COVID-19, even with completing a full vaccine series. In addition, the risk for severe illness is higher in immunocompromised people. One reason is because the virus can survive longer in their bodies.

Vaccine protection

Evusheld is the latest research breakthrough providing hope to one of the most vulnerable populations in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Now, “normal” is a little bit closer for even more individuals.

At Arizona Clinical Trials and Arizona Liver Health, we specialize in conducting clinical research studies to improve care options for liver diseases and other conditions. We are excited about what Evusheld means for individuals with compromised immune systems due to the advanced stages of liver disease. In the meantime, we are still offering FREE fibroscans to adults at risk of liver disease and research studies you can join to help advance treatments for conditions that affect the liver.

Your liver is an organ with over 500 functions

To learn more, contact us today at (480) 360-4000 or visit our website.

Sources:

https://www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/coronavirus/immunocompromised-covid-vaccine

https://www.upmc.com/coronavirus/monoclonal-antibodies/immunocompromised-patients

https://www.astrazeneca.com/media-centre/press-releases/2022/evusheld-long-acting-antibody-combination-recommended-for-approval-in-the-eu-for-the-pre-exposure-prophylaxis-prevention-of-covid-19.html

https://www.fda.gov/media/154702/download


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Like many other liver diseases, hepatitis B is a “silent epidemic” because most people do not have symptoms for most of the disease progression. It is one of the most common serious liver infections globally and in the state of Arizona, despite the fact it’s preventable and treatable. It’s time to get the facts on hepatitis B.

What is Hepatitis B, and How Does it Affect the Liver?

liver health

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a viral infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. The word hepatitis means “liver inflammation”; in this case, HBV is the cause of the inflammation. HBV is a short-term illness for most people, while others develop a serious long-term infection. Chronic inflammation (swelling and reddening) can lead to liver damage, cirrhosis (hardening or scarring), liver cancer, and in some cases death.

Hepatitis B spreads when bodily fluids like blood or semen from a person with the virus enter the body of someone without HBV. This can happen through:

  • Sexual contact
  • Sharing needles, syringes, or other IV drug use equipment
  • From mother to baby at birth.

Not everyone experiences symptoms with HBV. Symptoms include fatigue, loss of appetite, stomach pain, nausea, and jaundice for those who do.

Hepatitis B is Treatable and Preventable

The treatments your healthcare provider recommends will depend on the type of hepatitis B you have, acute or chronic.

  • Acute hepatitis B infections
    • Short-lived infections typically require that you get plenty of rest, drink lots of fluids, and maintain a nutritious and healthy diet to give your body the support it needs as it fights off the infection.
  • Chronic hepatitis B infections
    • There are seven FDA-approved drugs for hepatitis B for chronic, long-term infections. Two are injectable treatments that help boost the immune system to fight off the virus. The five other options are antivirals you take orally. These treatments help reduce inflammation and damage to the liver.

HBV vaccine

The hepatitis B vaccine is available and recommended for all infants at birth and children up to 18 years. Since everyone is at some risk, all adults should consider getting the vaccine since it provides a lifetime of protection against a preventable chronic liver disease. Even more so, for those adults living with diabetes and those with an increased risk for infection (job, lifestyle, etc.).

Arizona and Hepatitis B

HBV disproportionately affects Asians and Pacific Islanders, which is also a growing population in Arizona. According to the CDC, Asian and Pacific Islanders make up less than 5 percent of the U.S. population. However, this community of those living with hepatitis B.

Your liver health is in your hands

Increasing awareness with community education and improving how HBV is detected and treated through clinical research studies has never been more critical. Arizona Liver Health has new hepatitis b studies starting soon! Visit our website to learn more about hepatitis b or contact us at (480) 470-4000.

Sources:

https://www.hepb.org/what-is-hepatitis-b/what-is-hepb/

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/4246-hepatitis-b

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona/2016/08/15/asian-pacific-health-group-takes-aim-hepatitis-b-arizona/87670654/

 

 


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Jaundice is a yellowing of the eye sclera (the white part) and skin because there’s too much bilirubin in the blood. There are many causes of jaundice. However, for people living with liver disease, jaundice is a common nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) complication.

Bilirubin, the Liver, and Jaundice

Jaundice

Bilirubin is formed while recycling old or damaged red blood cells. The bilirubin travels through the bloodstream to the liver. Then, it binds with bile and moves through the bile ducts into the digestive tract for removal from the body. Jaundice can develop when bilirubin levels build up in the blood and deposit in the skin. Any disease or other factor that prevents bilirubin from being eliminated from the body can lead to jaundice. The most common causes are:

  • Liver infections, like hepatitis
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Gallstone disease
  • Some medicines and herbal supplements
  • Cirrhosis
  • Cancer of the gallbladder or pancreas

Bilirubin

In addition, high bilirubin levels can cause an accumulation of substances the body forms when it breaks bile down. This can lead to itching all over the body.

Hepatitis and Jaundice

The word hepatitis means liver inflammation and is a crucial part of the damage to the liver NASH causes. NASH is a more severe form of fatty liver disease where there is an excessive accumulation of fat in the liver. While a simple fatty liver isn’t necessarily harmful, it can progress to NASH which is marked by chronic inflammation.

In some individuals, the accumulation of fat in the liver triggers the body’s healing response. The immune response includes:

  • Inflammation (increases oxygen-rich blood and other nutrients to damaged areas)
  • Liver cell repair
  • Application of collagen to protect healing areas

Normally, this is a self-limiting reaction, which means that once repairs and healing are complete, the body sends a signal to the immune system to switch off the healing response. With NASH and other liver diseases, most people are unaware they have a condition because there are no noticeable symptoms at first. If you don’t know something is wrong, you also don’t seek treatment or make healthier lifestyle changes to reduce the amount of fat in the liver.

This means that the liver continues accumulating fat and, therefore, continues the healing response. Eventually, chronic liver inflammation begins to scar and damage the liver replacing healthy liver cells with stiff, fibrous, non-functioning scar tissue. Over time, the liver can progress into cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Without enough healthy cells, the liver cannot perform its vital functions, including moving the bilirubin through the bile ducts.

Reducing the Prevalence of NASH

The prevalence of NASH is growing at an alarming rate in America. There are no FDA-approved treatments available currently for NASH, but potential new options are being evaluated in clinical trials. Arizona Liver Health offers a FREE fibroscan to adults at risk of liver disease to check the health of their liver. To schedule your FREE fibroscan appointment or explore our enrolling NASH studies, contact us today at (480) 470-4000!

Sources:

https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/liver-and-gallbladder-disorders/manifestations-of-liver-disease/jaundice-in-adults

https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2017/0201/p164-s1.html

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15367-adult-jaundice


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Hepatitis C is a liver infection from the hepatitis C virus (HCV). For some people, HCV causes short-term illness. However, for more than half, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection that can result in severe and life-threatening health problems. Liver diseases like hepatitis C progressively damage the liver over many years without notice. Learning about how it affects the liver and ways you can prevent and manage it are the best possible steps to fight it.

hepatitis words

How HCV Affects the Liver

The hepatitis C virus spreads by coming into contact with an infected person’s blood. Hepatitis C can cause an acute or chronic infection:

  • Acute hepatitis C
    • Acute hepatitis C is a short-term infection where symptoms can last up to 6 months. In some cases, the body can sometimes fight off the infection, and the virus goes away.
  • Chronic hepatitis C
    • Chronic hepatitis C occurs when the body cannot fight off the virus, resulting in a long-lasting infection. Around 75 to 85 percent of people with acute hepatitis C will develop chronic hepatitis C.

Abdominal pain-HepC

Symptoms of hepatitis C include:

  • Dark yellow urine
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Gray-colored stools
  • Pain in the joints
  • Decrease in appetite
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Yellowing of the whites of the eyes and skin

Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver” from infection, autoimmune disorder, or other factors. Regardless of the cause, these events trigger the body’s healing response, which rushes oxygen-rich blood, vital nutrients, and other special repair cells to the liver to heal it. We know of this process as inflammation. Most people with HCV have no idea they have it, so nothing is done to suppress or treat the infection.

Without treatment, the healing response continues trying to repair the liver. Over time, chronic inflammation and excess repair materials like collagen begin to damage and scar the liver. HCV can cause cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure.

Managing Hepatitis C

The World Health Organization (WHO) states that antiviral medicines can cure more than 95% of persons with hepatitis C infection. You can help keep your liver healthy by eating healthy, staying active, and kicking the habits that harm your health.

Remember, most people with HCV don’t know it, so understanding the risk factors can help with early diagnosis and prevention.

Risk factors for HCV:

  • Healthcare workers exposed to infected blood
  • History or a current user of injected or inhaled illicit drugs
  • Diagnosed with HIV
  • Have tattoos or body piercings
  • Underwent a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992
  • Were treated with clotting factor concentrates before 1987
  • If your mother had a hepatitis C infection when you were born
  • If you ever worked or lived in prison
  • Have been on kidney dialysis

Liver disease can lead to hepatitis

Arizona Liver Health has a new hepatitis C study starting soon. To learn more, call us today at (480) 470-4000.

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/index.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hepatitis-c/symptoms-causes/syc-20354278

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/liver-disease/viral-hepatitis/hepatitis-c


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Alcohol is one of the most widely used substances among America’s adult and teen populations, posing substantial health and safety risks. Even though most know the adverse effects of alcohol, many tend to do so without fully recognizing the health risks of consuming alcohol excessively. The liver is one of the essential organs in the body, and when it comes to alcohol, it can have devastating effects.

Your liver detoxifies your body, keeps you alert, and regulates your hormones

The Metabolization of Alcohol

On average, it takes the body about an hour to process one alcoholic beverage. Every additional drink increased that time frame. The more a person drinks, the longer it takes to process alcohol. That’s because the liver can only process so much at a time. When someone drinks too much, the alcohol left unprocessed by the liver circulates through the bloodstream and starts affecting the heart and brain. This is how people become intoxicated. Two liver enzymes begin to break apart the alcohol molecule so it the body can eventually eliminate them.

Woman on the floor with empty alcohol bottles

Alcohol’s Destruction

One of those enzymes, ADH, helps convert alcohol to acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde is only in the body for a short time, but it is highly toxic and a known carcinogen. Some small amounts of alcohol are also eliminated from the body by forming fatty acid compounds. These compounds can damage the liver and pancreas.

The toxic effects of acetaldehyde have been linked to the development of cancers of the:

  • Mouth
  • Throat
  • Upper respiratory tract
  • Liver
  • Colon
  • Breasts

Chronic alcohol abuse (drinking 4 or 5 drinks in a row regularly) also destroys liver cells, which progress from fatty liver to alcoholic hepatitis (inflammation) to cirrhosis (scarring). However, heavy drinkers may develop alcoholic cirrhosis without first developing hepatitis.

Is There a Safe Amount of Alcohol?

While there is no safe amount of alcohol you can consume, you can reduce your risk of liver damage by drinking less. Individuals can drink in moderation by limiting intake to 2 drinks or less in a day for men or one drink or less for women.

The purpose of a fibroscan

Does the health of your liver concern you? Arizona Liver Health offers a FREE fibroscan for adults at risk of liver disease. To learn more, call (480) 470-4000 or request an appointment online today!

Sources:

https://www.verywellmind.com/alcohol-metabolism-key-to-alcohols-dangers-66524

https://www.addictioncenter.com/alcohol/liver/


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April is National Minority Health Month (NMHM), a time to raise awareness about health disparities that affect people from racial and ethnic minority groups. Liver disease is growing in prevalence in the Hispanic population. It is also a leading cause of death in the U.S. Through education, we can lower the risk. Through participation, we can expand treatment options. These are some of the reasons minority participation in liver research matters.

Why Minorities Should Participate in Research

Diversity is vital in research because understanding how a condition affects different populations helps design safe, more effective treatments. Diversity is not just race and ethnicity but also gender, age, etc. Participants in clinical trials should represent the patient populations that will use the medical products. The reason is that people of different ages, races, and ethnicities may react differently to medical treatments.

Hispanics and Liver Disease

Hispanic middle aged couple preparing a meal

The most prevalent liver diseases in Hispanics are non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), chronic hepatitis C, alcoholic liver disease, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The risk factors for these conditions include:

  • Obesity
  • Inactive lifestyle
  • Poor diet
  • Metabolic syndrome

7 symptoms of liver problems

When you look at the prevalence of these risk factors in Hispanics in the U.S., the results are:

  • 43% of Hispanics are considered obese
  • 35% of Hispanics have metabolic syndrome
  • Hispanic diets are traditionally high in carbohydrates and added sugars

In addition, many Hispanics in the U.S. possess a gene variation, PNPLA3, which has an association with a heightened risk for NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

Liver Health is in Our Name!

Implementing the best education practices toward healthy lifestyle changes will help address the risks associated with cultural aspects. However, we need to do more work regarding the genetic predisposition and expanding treatments for individuals already living with liver disease. Why not trust the experts with “liver health” in their name when it comes to liver disease? For NMHM, consider giving back through research.

1 in 4 adults are living with liver disease

Arizona Liver Health offers FREE fibroscans to adults at risk of liver disease and a chance to help advance care options for liver diseases through our studies. Get involved today! Contact us at (480) 470-4000 to learn more about your liver and options for treatment of liver disease, or visit our website.

Sources:

https://txliver.com/media/hispanics-and-liver-disease/

https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=62#:~:text=Both%20Hispanic%20men%20and%20women,their%20non%2DHispanic%20white%20counterparts.

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/AZ


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Liver health is essential to the function of the human body. It performs over 500 functions to keep the body healthy. A few examples are flushing out toxins, processing food, and maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. Hepatitis is one of the most common conditions that can permanently damage the liver without proper treatment. Learning more about hepatitis and what you need to know to take care of your liver are the most important steps you can take for a healthier future.

What is Hepatitis?

The definition of hepatitis means liver inflammation and is commonly the result of a contagious viral infection. Some types of hepatitis are non-viral, meaning one person cannot pass it to another. For example, autoimmune hepatitis typically has a genetic origin, and alcoholic hepatitis develops from excessive drinking. An individual can also contract the types of hepatitis spread by consuming contaminated food and drinks and mixing their bodily fluids with an infected person. There are six main types of hepatitis, but A, B, and C (Hep A, Hep B, Hep C) are the three most prevalent.

Hepatitis

Symptoms of hepatitis vary from mild to severe and can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting more than six months). Treatments are available for every type of hepatitis. However, types A and C are the only curable ones now. As far as vaccines, both A and B have vaccines available. It’s safe to vaccinate against Hep A starting at one year old, while Hep B vaccination series can start sooner in infants.

Keeping the liver healthy with hepatitis is critical. Now, let’s talk about some ways to help!

A Balanced Diet and Hydration

Maintaining a balanced diet starts by reducing refined carbs such as white bread and processed sweets. Instead, try incorporating whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. It would be best if you also were mindful of the types of fats consumed. Consider eating modest quantities of meat and dairy. Additionally, try incorporating more monounsaturated fats commonly found in seeds, nuts, and fish.

Ways to love your liver

Furthermore, drinking enough water for proper hydration is essential to help flush the liver. Not to be a Debbie downer, but depending on the type of hepatitis, your doctor may recommend cutting out alcohol completely. The reason is that alcohol damages the liver, so limiting your intake is essential for the liver to keep functioning correctly. The good news for coffee lovers is that coffee is a beverage known to promote liver health. So, brew, French press, or pour your favorite java over ice for up to three servings a day!

Healthy Lifestyle

In addition to eating a balanced diet, you can further promote your liver health and prevent liver disease by:

  • Exercising regularly
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Staying physically active

Whether it’s weightlifting, swimming, or even a walk in the neighborhood, exercise can also turn triglycerides into fuel, reducing liver fat. A diagnosis of hepatitis doesn’t have to lead to liver damage. When you know how to keep your liver healthy and take the necessary steps, you have the power to live a healthier future.

An unhealthy diet can bully your liver into poor health

Check out this link to learn more about our liver studies and how participating in research can help you take the first steps on your journey to health. Our caring site staff can also answer any questions by contacting us at (480) 470-4000.

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm#:~:text=Hepatitis%20means%20inflammation%20of%20the,medical%20conditions%20can%20cause%20hepatitis

https://www.who.int/health-topics/hepatitis


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March is Women’s History Month, and it commemorates women’s contributions to history, culture, and society. The 2022 theme is “Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope.” It is a tribute to the countless ways women of all cultures provide healing and hope now and throughout history. In honor of Women’s History Month, we want to share how liver disease impacts women and how we can help prioritize your liver health.

March is Women's History Month

Common Types of Liver Disease

Liver disease is a term that encompasses a variety of conditions that affect the functioning of the liver. However, there are more than 100 types, most progress in the same way. In the U.S., fatty liver diseases, both alcohol and non-alcohol-related, are most common. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Alcohol-related fatty liver disease (ALD) occurs when the liver accumulates an unhealthy amount of fat.

Chronic excessive alcohol consumption causes ALD. Obesity, insulin resistance, and unhealthy lifestyles are risk factors for NAFLD. Both conditions trigger chronic inflammation of the liver and progressively damage it over several years without noticeable symptoms. As a result, scarring of the liver ensues. Without treatment, the damage to the liver becomes severe and can cause cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure.

How Liver Disease Affects Women

Hormonal changes and genetic makeup not only differentiate women from men, but they also influence:

  • Their response to medications and other things they consume
  • How diseases develop and progress
  • Why conditions are more prevalent in women versus men

These influences affect both forms of fatty liver disease in women by making them more susceptible to it. For example, women are more sensitive to drug or alcohol-related liver disease than men. Because females are smaller on average and have more body fat, both can cause them to metabolize drugs and alcohol at a slower rate than men. As a result, they are more sensitive to drug or alcohol-related liver disease and NAFLD.

Diverse group of women (1)

Checking Your Liver Health Can Change Everything

In 1966, James Brown and Betty Jean Newsome wrote It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World. The lyrics say, “This is a man’s world,…. But it wouldn’t be nothing,… without a woman or a girl.” To continue making history, women must also advocate and prioritize their health. Fatty liver disease is on the rise in epidemic proportions.

Don't pinch your luck. Get a fibroscan today

Arizona Liver Health offers a FREE fibroscan for adults at risk of liver disease. The fibroscan is a painless, quick procedure that checks the health of your liver. Schedule your appointment today! Call us at (480) 470-4000 or submit a request through our website.

Other Source:

https://www.merckmanuals.com/home/liver-and-gallbladder-disorders/alcohol-related-liver-disease/alcohol-related-liver-disease



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2152 S Vineyard Ave Ste 123
Mesa, AZ 85210
480-360-4000


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1601 N Swan Rd
Tucson, AZ 85712
520-445-4000


Call us to see if you or your patient qualify for a clinical trial.